UH Libraries News

New Platform for UH Digital Collections

Cover of Daily Breakthrough, November 19, 1977. From the Carey C. Shuart Women's Research Collection, and accessible at UH Digital Collections.

Cover of Daily Breakthrough, November 19, 1977. From the Carey C. Shuart Women’s Research Collection, and accessible at UH Digital Collections.

The University of Houston Libraries Bayou City Digital Asset Management Systems (BCDAMS) team is pleased to announce the full launch of the new UH Digital Collections (UHDC) repository.

UHDC allows users to search rare and unique digitized and born­-digital ­­items from UH Libraries collections. With 66 of the Libraries’ 92 digital collections moved to the UHDC and the Audio/Video Repository, the final phase of the UHDC implementation represents a shift away from the previous platform known as the UH Digital Library.

Improvements include navigation, search/browse, and image viewer enhancements; robust options for access and download restrictions; permalinks across access, preservation, and finding aids; and Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliance for accessibility.

How to search UH Digital Collections

Publicity photo of The Sensational Nightingales, midcentury. From the Texas Music Collection, Houston & Texas History Research Collection, and accessible at UH Digital Collections.

Publicity photo of The Sensational Nightingales, midcentury. From the Texas Music Collection, Houston & Texas History Research Collection, and accessible at UH Digital Collections.

The purpose of the BCDAMS team is to bring a new digital collections experience to all Libraries users by upgrading the previous Digital Library, incorporating digital preservation strategies, and streamlining workflows for digital collection production.

The team stated that “UH Digital Collections supports the UH Strategic Plan goal of nationally competitive research by providing the infrastructure to promote interdisciplinary and inter-institutional research in areas such as energy and sustainability, history, social sciences, and the arts. Digital collections are currently being used in innovative faculty, staff, and student research projects across campus, and we look forward to engaging further with digital humanities and data science researchers through the improvements provided by the new system.”

Kelleher Appointed to Emily Scott Evans Endowed Professorship

Christian Kelleher

Christian Kelleher

Christian Kelleher, head of University of Houston Libraries Special Collections, has been awarded the Emily Scott Evans Endowed Library Professorship, effective November 1. The appointment enables UH Libraries to further develop impactful collections that support core University priorities for research, teaching, and learning.

The Emily Scott Evans Endowed Library Professorship was established in 2002 by Ms. Evans’ daughter, Alice Evans Pratt. Emily Scott Evans was a longtime friend of UH Special Collections, and the Evans Professorship was created specifically to support an Endowed Library Professor in the department.

As part of his role, Kelleher also curates the Libraries’ primary source collections in Visual Arts  and Energy and Sustainability. Kelleher came to UH in 2015 from the University of Texas at Austin where he was the archivist and assistant head librarian at the Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection and managed UT Libraries’ Human Rights Documentation Initiative. He holds a Master of Library and Information Science degree and a Master of Arts degree in Journalism from UT. Previously, Kelleher was an archivist and records manager with History Associates Incorporated in Rockville, MD, a development assistant with literary publisher Graywolf Press in Minneapolis, MN, and a Peace Corps volunteer in the Republic of Guinea, West Africa. He currently serves on the boards of CASETA, the Center for Advancement and Study of Early Texas Art, and of the Petroleum History Institute. His research interests include community archives post-custodial archives practice, and the intersections thereof.

“Christian personifies excellence in scholarship, service, and collaboration,” said Athena Jackson, dean of UH Libraries and Elizabeth D. Rockwell chair. “His leadership propels UH Special Collections forward in its mission to preserve and make accessible unique materials for research, and he continues to expand collections that have generative, profound implications for UH Libraries and the scholarly community.”

Revamped Study Space at UH Music Library

University of Houston Music Library has a sleek new look. Research, relax, refine, and recharge at the transformed study space located in the Moores School of Music.

‘Sharing Stories from 1977’ Launches Digital Archive Preview

Sharing Stories from 1977: Putting the National Women’s Conference on the Map, a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Collaborative Research Grant, highlights a multi-year, multi-state, multi-institutional effort, led by Moores professor of history Nancy Beck Young and associate professor of history Leandra Zarnow, to document and analyze the experience and impact of thousands of delegates and observers of the 1977 National Women’s Conference (NWC). The goal of the project is to create an open source digital archive that spurs quantitative and qualitative scholarship as well as public engagement.

An online preview of this project is now live.

The preview introduces the project in anticipation of a debut of the full site on November 21, 2021. On that date, visitors will have access to research on the Texas delegates and presidential appointed commissioners with the remaining research to roll out quarterly starting in late spring 2022. An initial data set will showcase the dynamism of what Sharing Stories from 1977 will grow to be when the project is completed in 2027. Over 1000 UH students, as well as pilot crowdsourcing partners at colleges and universities in Indiana and California, contributed to the project. 

The site’s November 21 launch will include:

  • Why NWC Matters: featuring a historical timeline and interpretive essays on topics pertaining to the NWC
  • Discover NWC Stories: showcasing biographies and oral histories of NWC participants
  • Mapping the NWC: presenting searchable demographic data on the lives, advocacy work, and careers of NWC participants
  • How to Contribute: featuring resources for NWC participants, students, researchers, archivists, educators, and the general public

“The NEH has recognized Sharing Stories from 1977 as an innovative space for students to do historical research that builds their critical thinking and writing skills while also contributing to our digital public square,” Zarnow said. “Documenting the stories of dynamic and diverse women active in communities across the United States makes clear not only that the 1970s was a high point of civic engagement, but also that the issues advocated for then from child care to LGBT rights continue to matter today.”

The Sharing Stories project received funds from the UH Libraries Digital Research Commons and the Libraries Sponsored Projects program, which offers grants for digital research projects at various stages of development. The DRC cultivates interdisciplinary research and builds communities of practice around digital research methodologies.

Additionally, the Sharing Stories project received funds from the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality, partnered with UH Special Collections Carey C. Shuart Women’s Research Collection, and is a flagship project of the UH Center for Public History.  

Support the Sharing Stories project.

New Exhibit Features Works and Archives of Dorothy Hood

Artworks and archives of prominent Houston artist Dorothy Hood are on display at University of Houston Libraries Special Collections in an exhibit organized by Public Art of the University of Houston System in collaboration with the Art Museum of South Texas (AMST) and UH Libraries.

Part of the exhibit ‘Dorothy Hood: The Edge of Being’

From the Public Art of UH website: “As an artist, Texas-born Dorothy Hood (1918-2000) was best known for abstract works layered with a variety of materials, motifs and meanings. During her long career, her canvases and works on paper often referenced physical and mental landscapes as well as the connections between inner and outer worlds. Hood’s work was liminal, seamlessly moving between big concepts and the deeply personal.”

Related: AMST Donates Hood-Velasco Maidana Papers to UH Special Collections

Public Art of University of Houston System Celebrates Art of Dorothy Hood, Trendsetting Texas Artist

Visitors interested in an immersive look at Hood’s personal archives are encouraged to contact head of Special Collections Christian Kelleher.

Visionary Art Collaborative Event

NMA Parade Flyer

NMA Parade Flyer

A screening of Laurie MacDonald’s 2001 film Eyeopeners along with her rarely-seen documentary of the 1986 New Music America (NMA) Festival in Houston will be shown in the back patio of Brasil Café: 2604 Dunlavy St. Houston, TX 77098 on October 20 at 7 pm.

The event is part of a collaboration between University of Houston Libraries Special Collections and The Orange Show Center for Visionary Art. The exhibit UNREAL ESTATES: Houston’s Visionary Art Environments will be open to the public at the Flatland Gallery (next door to Brasil Café) during the event.

The documentary is part of the New Music America Collection in the Performing and Visual Arts Research Collection at UH Special Collections.

The 1986 New Music America Festival, which gave rise to the Houston Art Car Parade, comprises a large part of the collection. Donated by the late Michael Galbreth of The Art Guys, the collection features correspondence, posters, programs, photos, and artwork documenting NMA, a peripatetic festival of experimental music. The festival was, at that time, the largest new music celebration in the world. Its origin was New York City, and in subsequent years, the festival traveled to major cities across the US, landing in Houston in 1986.

Mary Manning, university archivist and curator of the Performing Arts Research Collection, will exhibit items from the NMA collection at the Orange Show event.

Call for Applications: Spring 2022 Digital Research Institute

University of Houston Libraries Digital Research Commons (DRC) invites all UH graduate and professional students to submit an application for participation in the Spring 2022 Digital Research Institute, a multi-day intensive experience aimed at building the foundational skills and knowledge needed to generate a piece of digital research.

UH grad students are encouraged to apply to the Spring 2022 Digital Research Institute.

UH grad students are encouraged to apply to the Spring 2022 Digital Research Institute.

The Institute will take place on Zoom over five days, March 14 – 19, 2022, the week of Spring Break, 10:00 am – 4:00 pm daily. It is aimed at those who are in the beginning phases of digital research that is intended to form the basis for part of an article or a thesis/dissertation. The 4-6 students who are best positioned to benefit from the experience will be offered a seat in the Institute along with a $500 scholarship, provided by the UH Graduate School and UH Libraries, to be received after successful completion of the experience.

Participants must attend all five days of the Institute plus a virtual interview with DRC staff and “Getting Started” cohort discussion to be scheduled the week before the Institute. Participants will be assigned individualized pre-work and readings that will give them the theoretical and conceptual grounding needed to undertake the work of the Institute and exit the experience with the tangible beginnings of their digital research as well as next steps. Over the Institute, they will attend 3-5 sessions per day delivered by Digital Research Commons staff and other digital research practitioners, each targeted at building technical skills and offering individualized mentorship.

To apply, fill out this form by Friday, November 19, 11:59 pm.

Questions? Contact the staff in the Digital Research Commons: drc@uh.edu.

Makerspace Offers Tools and Support for Creativity

The University of Houston community is invited to check out the UH Libraries Makerspace. Located on the first floor of the MD Anderson Library within the South Computer Lab, the Makerspace offers tools and support for anyone working on projects, making objects, or building electronic devices. All students on the UH campus, regardless of major, are encouraged to explore the space and the opportunities it presents for discovery and collaboration.

Makerspace Workshops

In-person workshops are happening this semester on topics such as Arduino and sewing. Have an idea for other Makerspace workshop topics? If you represent a student or faculty organization that is interested in collaborating to create a workshop, contact us.

The Makerspace is seeking volunteer instructors or sponsors on the following workshop topics:

  • Introduction to AI on PyTorch
  • Introduction to Machine Vision on OpenCV
  • Raspberry Pi Retro Gaming
  • Introduction to Soldering
  • Making Origami with a Laser Cutter
  • Beginning Embroidery
  • Using a Oscilloscope 101

Kit Check-Out

Kit check-out is a popular service available for all UH students and faculty. The Makerspace provides educational kits for learning electronics and microprocessors, including Ardunio, Raspberry Pi, Intel Edison, Beaglebone Black, and most Texas Instruments microprocessors. The kits are perfect for building prototypes and applying electronics concepts. View kit inventory

Equipment

Makerspace equipment

Makerspace equipment

The UH community has access to Makerspace equipment and technical expertise in fabricating components. One-hour reservations are available for:

  • Glowforge laser cutter station
  • Electronics workstation
  • Sewing/serger station

Project Spotlight

Bernard Li teaches an Arduino workshop.

Bernard Li teaches an Arduino workshop.

Spiderbot is an Arduino-controlled autonomous robot that wanders around the MD Anderson Library. Throughout the month of October, Spiderbot is filled with the Halloween spirit and features a pumpkin stuffed with candy for students to enjoy. 

UH Libraries Hosts the Banner Project

This month, visitors to the University of Houston MD Anderson Library will notice a suite of banners displayed in the atrium. Known as The Banner Project and created by Houston activist Sara Fernandez, the pop-up exhibit features pivotal points in Houston’s LGBT history from the 1930s to present day.

The Banner Project at UH Libraries

The Banner Project at UH Libraries

2021 marks the fifth year that UH Libraries has partnered with Fernandez to host the banners, which were produced by graphic designer Kirk Baxter. A new addition includes Houston Splash Galveston (1988), bringing the total banner count to 47.

The Banner Project is on display in conjunction with October 11, which is National Coming Out Day.

2022 Sponsored Projects Call for Proposals

University of Houston Libraries Digital Research Services (DRS) invites UH faculty, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows to submit proposals for sponsored digital research projects to run through the calendar year 2022. DRS collaborates with researchers on projects involving digital techniques across the humanities, social sciences, and experimental sciences.

DRS seeks teams or individuals, experts and novices alike, who have a project that they would like to develop. This can either be a project that is already underway or one not yet begun. While prior knowledge of digital tools and techniques is welcome, it is not required. DRS works with researchers to help them organize their information, analyze it, and produce compelling results.

DRS will offer grants at three levels, designed to address projects at different levels of development. The first level, designed to help projects at the seed stage of development, will offer funding up to $3500. The second, designed to develop projects that have already made demonstrable progress, will offer funding up to $6500. The third tier, designed to foster projects at a planning stage, will offer funding up to $1000, and focus primarily on producing a polished application for federal or external grants.

Accepted applicants will work with Libraries staff to plan and build their projects into working prototypes. DRS encourages applications from project teams in the public humanities broadly understood, in particular those that engage the public in current social equality and justice themes and are composed of team members that advance these movements. Additionally, DRS is interested in proposals that integrate or analyze UH Libraries Special Collections.

Proposals are due by November 5. For more information on how to submit your proposal, visit Sponsored Projects Program Overview and Documentation.

By on September 27th, 2021 in Announcements, Digital Research, Featured