UH Libraries News

Research Workshop Series Spring 2019

University of Houston Libraries will offer a series of workshops for faculty, researchers, and students to hone their skills on a variety of research tools.

Each workshop will be hands-on to get participants quickly familiar with the tools for use in their own research. All workshops will be held in the MD Anderson Library.

Finding Data: February 12, 1-2:30 p.m., room 10F
Participants will be introduced to commonly-used library data sources and open data portals; learn tips for finding data, and discuss how to evaluate the quality of data sources.

Introduction to Tableau: February 19, 1-2:30 p.m., room 10F
Participants will use Tableau Public to create interactive data visualizations. The workshop will cover an overview of the program and provide hands-on experience creating basic charts and maps, as well as creating interactive web-based visualization dashboards; and publishing to the Tableau Public web server.

Tableau Intermediate: February 26, 1-2:30 p.m., room 10F
Participants will use more advanced features in Tableau to manage data, such as join, union and edit data; and use calculations and parameters to make views more interactive. The workshop will cover analytics to help spot trends and forecast data. Taking Introduction to Tableau prior to this workshop is strongly encouraged.

Data Cleaning with OpenRefine: February 28, 1-2:30 p.m., room 106R
OpenRefine (formerly Google Refine) is a tool for working with semi-structured datasets. It allows you to explore data, easily find facet patterns within data, and enable simple detection of data inconsistencies. It also offers quick clean-up and transformation options. In this workshop, participants will learn how to perform common data cleaning functions and use GREL (Google Refine Expression Language) for more advanced cleaning needs.

Online Mapping with ArcGIS Online: March 5, 1-2:30 p.m., room 106R
Participants will learn basic terminologies for geographic information system (GIS) mapping and identify opportunities to apply GIS in your work; and how to use ArcGIS online to create a map with lines, points, and polygons. We will use real data to create a Houston hurricane evacuation map and see where City of Houston’s non-emergency service calls were received to report flooding during Hurricane Harvey. We will also add demographic data to the map and identify areas that need more assistance during the evacuation.

Introduction to ArcMap: March 7, 1-2:30 p.m., room 106R
This workshop will provide an overview of how ArcGIS software can help you analyze or visualize digital data that has a locational component. Participants will become familiar with the ArcGIS interface, create a simple map, edit the layout, and export the map into different formats. It will also introduce learning resources to explore more GIS.

Introduction to Tableau, March 21, 10-11:30 a.m., room 10F
Participants will use Tableau Public to create interactive data visualizations. The workshop will cover an overview of the program and provide hands-on experience creating basic charts and maps, as well as creating interactive web-based visualization dashboards; and publishing to the Tableau Public web server.

Tableau Intermediate: March 28, 10-11:30 a.m., room 10F
Participants will use more advanced features in Tableau to manage data, such as join, union and edit data; and use calculations and parameters to make views more interactive. The workshop will cover analytics to help spot trends and forecast data. Taking Introduction to Tableau prior to this workshop is strongly encouraged.

Introduction to ArcMap: April 4, 1-2:30 p.m., room 106R
This workshop will provide an overview of how ArcGIS software can help you analyze or visualize digital data that has a locational component. Participants will become familiar with the ArcGIS interface, create a simple map, edit the layout, and export the map into different formats. It will also introduce learning resources to explore more GIS.

Mapping Census Data: April 9, 1-2:30 p.m., room 106R
Participants will learn how to retrieve census data and join the data with census TIGER shapefiles, a public domain data source which has many geographic features. Using ArcMap, participants will create choropleth maps, thematic maps in which areas are shaded in proportion to the measurement of the statistical variable being displayed on the map, such as population density or per-capita income. Taking Introduction to ArcMap prior to this workshop is strongly encouraged.

Geocoding and Mapping Location Data: April 11, 1-2:30 p.m., room 106R
Participants will learn a few ways to geocode, the process of converting addresses (like a street address) into geographic coordinates (like latitude and longitude); and learn how to retrieve location data from library databases, geocode them, and place them on the map. Taking Introduction to ArcMap prior to this workshop is strongly encouraged.

By on February 13th, 2019 in Announcements, Featured, New Service

Presentation: Digitizing Archives in Russia

Alexey Golubev, assistant professor in the UH department of History, will present Digitizing Archives in Russia: Epistemic Sovereignty and Its Challenges in the Digital Age on Thursday, February 21 at 12 noon in the UH Libraries Digital Research Commons. The talk will be followed by a workshop on constructing and maintaining a corpus in digital projects. Sandwiches and coffee will be served.

Golubev will speak on the production of digital archives in a broader context of the political economy of historical knowledge in Russia. The archive is a key institution that asserts state sovereignty over history by defining the dominant forms of historical knowledge, its limits and silences, and establishing hierarchies of voices from the past. Modern information technologies represent a formidable challenge to maintaining this epistemic sovereignty as they have simplified to the extreme a precise reproduction of historical documents and production of digital archives. The talk will focus on several cases of digital archives to discuss this challenge and the measures that the Russian state implements to maintain its sovereign control over historical knowledge.

Golubev’s experience in digital humanities stems from his work on several digital collections and archives, including a digital archive of the Russian imperial newspaper News of the Olonets Governorate (1838-1917). He currently works on a project to create a corpus of Russian war letters, supported by a seed grant from the Digital Research Commons.

Poetry and Prose February 20

University of Houston Libraries and UH Creative Writing Program invite you to Poetry and Prose on Wednesday, February 20, featuring faculty Chinelo Okparanta and Hayan Charara. Readings start at 5:30 p.m. in the Honors College Commons, and light refreshments will be served.

Hayan Charara is a poet, children’s book author, essayist, and editor. His poetry books are Something Sinister (2016), The Sadness of Others (2006), and The Alchemist’s Diary (2001). His children’s book, The Three Lucys (2016), received the New Voices Award Honor, and he edited Inclined to Speak (2008), an anthology of contemporary Arab American poetry. With Fady Joudah, he is also a series editor of the Etel Adnan Poetry Prize. His honors include a literature fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Lucille Joy Prize in Poetry from the University of Houston Creative Writing Program, the John Clare Prize, and the Arab American Book Award.

Chinelo Okparanta’s debut short story collection, Happiness, Like Water, was cited as an editors’ choice in the New York Times Book Review and was named on the list of The Guardian’s Best African Fiction of 2013. The book was nominated for the Nigerian Writers Award (Young Motivational Writer of the Year), longlisted for the 2013 Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award and was a finalist for the 2014 New York Public Library Young Lions Fiction Award as well as the Etisalat Prize for Literature. Okparanta was also a finalist for the 2013 Caine Prize for African Writing, the 2013 Society of Midland Authors Award, and the 2014 Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative in Literature. She has published work in The New Yorker, Granta, Tin House, the Kenyon Review, AGNI, and other venues, and was named one of Granta’s six New Voices for 2012. In 2017, Okparanta was named one of Granta’s Best of Young American Novelists. Under the Udala Trees is her first novel.

By on February 13th, 2019 in Announcements, Featured

Blind Date with a Book

The Architecture, Design, and Art Library is hosting “Blind Date with a Book” for the month of February.

Blind Date with a Book

Blind Date with a Book

Students are encouraged to check out a “blind date” book from the Architecture, Design, and Art Library display, unwrap it, and read it. Students can fill out the “Rate Your Date” form included with the book, even if it was not finished. Return the form by February 28 to enter a prize drawing.

Video Presentation: Alternative Textbook Incentive Program

The cost of textbooks is a significant burden to the success of many University of Houston students. As part of the University’s initiative to help mitigate the high cost of textbooks, the UH Alternative Textbook Incentive Program (ATIP) awards UH instructors who adopt, modify, or create an open or alternative textbook in their courses.

Nearly 50 guests attended last week’s Emerging Trends in Educational Technology presentation focusing on ATIP and open educational resources (OER). Presenters included OER coordinator Ariana Santiago as well as UH faculty who have implemented alternative textbooks.

Watch Alternative Textbook Incentive Program: Faculty Insights video | View PDF

UH Libraries is now accepting applications for the 2019 – 2020 ATIP. Instructors of record for a Summer 2019, Fall 2019 or Spring 2020 course are encouraged to apply by March 29, 2019. Awards of between $500 and $2500 will be made based on the estimated financial impact for students, type of alternative textbook project, and overall feasibility of the proposal.

By on February 11th, 2019 in Announcements, Featured

Promotion and Tenure Recognition

University of Houston Libraries and the UH Office of the Provost celebrated the accomplishments of newly promoted and tenured faculty and librarians at a reception this month.

Honorees’ book selections are in the Libraries catalog and on display in a digital exhibit.

Honorees’ book selections are in the Libraries catalog and on display in a digital exhibit.

The UH Promotion and Tenure Recognition Program was created to honor faculty and librarians who have recently been promoted or achieved tenure. Now in its fourth year, the program invited honorees to select a book that has offered inspiration or encouragement in their professional journey. Book selections were added to the Libraries catalog and book-plated, serving as an enduring tribute to the pursuit of excellence in service, scholarship and learning.

View 2018 honorees and their book selections in the Promotion and Tenure Recognition Program online exhibit.

View photos from the reception.

By on February 6th, 2019 in Announcements, Featured

Call for Applications: Alternative Textbook Incentive Program

University of Houston Libraries is now accepting applications for the UH Alternative Textbook Incentive Program. As part of the University’s initiative to help mitigate the high cost of textbooks for students, the incentive program will award UH instructors who adopt, modify, or create an open or alternative textbook in their courses.

Instructors of record for a Summer 2019, Fall 2019 or Spring 2020 course are encouraged to apply to the UH Alternative Textbook Incentive Program by March 29, 2019. Awards of between $500 and $2500 will be made based on the estimated financial impact for students, type of alternative textbook project, and overall feasibility of the proposal.

Open educational resources (OER) offer an alternative to the problem of expensive textbooks for students. According to a recent survey conducted by the UH Student Government Association, over 37% of respondents have not purchased a required textbook due to the cost. By shifting to freely accessible and openly licensed teaching and learning tools, including textbooks, more students will have access to course materials, allowing them to be prepared for class on the first day, stay enrolled in the course, and perform better on course assignments.

Faculty are encouraged to attend an upcoming OER drop-in consultation to learn about the benefits of alternative textbooks and how to get started on offering an alternative textbook. Ariana Santiago, open educational resources coordinator, will be available in the Faculty Cafe during these hours and by appointment to discuss implementing open textbooks in the classroom and the support provided through the incentive program.

Please contact us at oer@uh.edu for more information.

By on February 5th, 2019 in Announcements, Featured

Register Today for the UH Libraries Data Event

University of Houston Libraries will host a free event featuring topics in data on Thursday, February 14. Faculty, staff, and students (especially grad students) are encouraged to attend. Register

Register for the Love Data @ UH event

Register for the Love Data @ UH event

Love Data @ UH Schedule

Sessions will be held at the Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavilion in the MD Anderson Library.

8:45 – 9:00 a.m.
Registration

9:00 – 9:10
Welcome
Lisa German, Dean of UH Libraries

9:10 – 10:30
Data for All Disciplines
Faculty panel:

  • Kathryn Anderson, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology 
  • Ioannis Pavlidis, Eckhard-Pfeiffer Professor, Department of Computer Science
  • Norman Johnson, Professor, Chair of Decision and Information Sciences, Bauer College of Business
  • Rodolfo Ostilla Mónico, Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering 
  • Temple Northup, Associate Professor of Communication, Director of Jack J. Valenti School of Communication

Moderator: Dr. Claude Willan, Director of Digital Research Commons

10:30 – 11:00
The UH Hewlett Packard Enterprise Data Science Institute
Dr. Andrea Prosperetti, Director of Hewlett Packard Enterprise Data Science Institute

11:00 – 11:15
Break

11:15 – Noon
Cross – Classified Random Effects Models in Psychology and Education
Dr. David Francis, Director of Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics (TIMES)

Noon – 1:00
Lunch: Pizza

1:00 – 2:00
Connecting Changemakers with Data
Jie Wu, Director of Research Management at Rice University Kinder Institute for Urban Research

2:00 – 3:00
Collections as Data
Wenli Gao, Data Services Librarian; Anne Washington, Coordinator of Metadata Services; Emily Vinson, Audiovisual Archivist

Love Data @ UH is sponsored by UH Libraries, UH Hewlett Packard Enterprise Data Science Institute, and TIMES.

Register

New Digital Collection: GCAM Archive

The Gulf Coast Archive and Museum Digital Archive is now available in the UH Digital Library.

Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 8, May 1978

Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 8, May 1978

More than 30 years of Houston LGBTQ history is preserved and presented in this collection from the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum of GLBT History (GCAM). The collection contains over 150 LGBT newspapers from central Texas, the Dallas/Fort Worth area, and other Texas regions, from the 1970s through the early 2000s.

GCAM was created to collect, preserve and provide access to historical items from the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender community in the gulf coast area of Texas. Over the last 20 years, GCAM has collected a broad variety of published materials relating to LGBTQ issues, both at the local and national level. Titles in this collection include The Star (Austin/San Antonio), South Texas Community News, and Bar Talk San Antonio. Mid-1970s issues from Gay Austin and Community News (Fort Worth/Dallas) are some of the earliest publications found in the collection.

The original materials are owned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum of GLBT History.

By on January 25th, 2019 in Announcements, Featured, New Resource

Student Art Exhibit Opens February 1

The William R. Jenkins Architecture, Design, and Art Library presents Tay Butler's American Geographic on Friday, February 1.

The William R. Jenkins Architecture, Design, and Art Library presents Tay Butler’s American Geographic on Friday, February 1.

The William R. Jenkins Architecture, Design, and Art Library is pleased to present American Geographic by student artist Tay Butler. The opening reception will be held on Friday, February 1 at 5 p.m., with light refreshments. The exhibit will be on view through April 2019, and is free and open to the public.

Butler is an undergraduate student in Photography and Digital Media at the University of Houston. With an expected graduation date of May 2019 and intentions to continue studies, Butler is consistently building a portfolio of work and exhibitions that include spaces all over Houston, Texas, such as the Blaffer Art Museum, Texas Art Asylum, and Noble Artisan.

A 20-year retired Army veteran with a background in power plant engineering, Butler completely transformed his life by walking away from a well-paying occupation in search of purpose and self-expression. Acknowledging the 2014 death of Mike Brown as the catalyst, he began his journey backwards into the archives of black history; including that of his own family. With a 23-hour U-Haul truck expedition through the snowstorms of Wisconsin to Houston, Butler began his studies at UH in the fall of 2015.

Initially choosing graphic design as a possible career path, Butler soon uncovered a deep love for photography. Studying the likes of Gordon Parks, Irving Penn, and Carrie Mae Weems led him to the work of his biggest influences, Lorna Simpson and Romare Bearden, where his obsession with collage was born. He soon began combining original photography of Milwaukee with found images of people of color to reframe his memory of home. When not exploring his past landscapes visually, he confronted his hometown’s history through media archives. Acknowledging a need for community, Butler began to do the very same in his new home of Houston.